…it's a passionate obsession.

Posts tagged “grow

Hot Pepper

Since the weather was very poor and not much can be done outside. I figured it was time to sow my peppers before it’s too late. The seeds were covered with a 1/4″ of compost and put into a carrier bag to conserve moisture and placed in a warm place. Seedlings should appear in 7-14 days. Hmmm, we’ll see.

pepper


Growing lobelia – a method I like to use

Since I can’t get out and about. I thought I’d share my way of dealing with lobelia seeds. I often read the problems associated with lobelia, yet I find it one of the easiest to grow. Having said that, many of my methods were learnt through trial and error. 

lobelia

1. Surface sow the seed onto moist compost in 4 or 5 rows and mist to adhere to seed to the compost. Here I’ve used the half size seed trays but you can use any size you wish.  Put into a carrier bag and using the handles, loosely tie so as not to let any moisture escape. Put into a warm light room/greenhouse and check at least once a day. Water using a fine spray bottle. Once germination has started remove from bag and position in a bright place, away from direct sunlight – direct sun will burn young seedlings.

lebelia 1
2. The seedlings should look something like this after a few weeks.

lobelia 3

3. When the seedlings reach this size they’re ready to be split and put into individual pots/modules.

lobelia 5

4. Using a ruler for example, run it along the edge and underneath – very similar to loosening a cake from its tin.

lobelia 6

5. Using the ruler, use it to cut each row.


6. It should look like this once it is separated.


 7. I find the ruler comes in handy when lifting from the tray.

lobelia9
8. Gently split into little clumps – they are very robust, so do not worry.

lobelai10
9. And pot on, into cells.

lobelia 11
10. Then finally water from below – here a poundshop cat litter tray does the bizz………and transfer to a warm greenhouse for them to grow on.

After a few weeks the roots should have took and the plant will have grown in size. This is the time to transfer the trays to a non heated place until its time for hardening off, which usually lasts for 2 weeks. Once the risk of frosts and nasty weather has passed they’ll be ready for planting in your favorite places. And don’t forget, for great displays feed regularly – just like us, they need food to maintain their looks throughout the season.

So, if you fancy giving Lobelia a go – this is a great method and one which works for me. Happy gardening. 🙂


Waiting for the sun…

Usually, the Easter weekend signals all things potatoes and garden centres. However, this year is different – it is snowing but only just…here in the Northeast, thank goodness. The same can’t be said for other parts of the country who have been shivering under a white blanket of the stuff all week. Thinking back to this time last year, we were in the grips of a mini heatwave with many of us basking under its rays down the local parks with the kids. Lovely it was !!

Sadly it proved to be the only bit heat to hit our shores in 2012 and the rest of the Spring and Summer was spent under a umbrella sporting an essential bit of kit; wellies.

I’m hoping this year will be different and this extended cold weather, which has been predicted to last for many more weeks yet, turns out to be a good omen for the coming summer. Long and hot. Oooh, what a thought !!

The potatoes I’ve chosen to grow this year are Rooster ( main crop). A versatile all-rounder which grow and cooks well, whether its mashed, boiled, steamed or baked.

So in the meantime, I’ll continue to nurse my cold with a beechams lemon and plot the season to come. Then hopefully in a few days I’ll be feeling well enough for a trip to my local garden centre to check the range of plants they have in stock.

I can’t wait.

beechams

Enjoy your Easter Weekend, whatever the weather.


I’ll be back !

It’s been a crazy 6 months or so and I’ve not had much spare time. Anyway it’s a new year, new season and I’m keener than ever to get started.

Checkout my 12 new babies they arrived a week or so ago as bare-root specimens and look at them now – unfurling and straightening out.

 Image


Container grown tomatoes

There is nothing more rewarding than standing in the greenhouse on a warm summer’s evening eating the fruits of your labour. Hand picked straight from the vine. But make no mistake, growing the best tasting tomatoes does require daily discipline and commitment, if grown indoors.

Selection of tomato plants

Growing from seed couldn’t be easier. Sow the seed via the seed packet instructions and place on a warm windowsill in your home until germination – expensive heated propagators are not needed.

However, this year I’ve cheated a tiny bit; well not intentionally. Every year we sow more than we need, and this year was no exception. So all my plants were started off by my gardener friends and offered to me when they were about 2 inches tall. And since I’d not set any of mine away, at the time. It seemed like such a shame to waste these good quality plants, so I accepted without hesitation.

I continued to grow these on in a heated greenhouse. Repotted them twice, so as not to stunt growth and now they are 25cm tall and ready for their final positions.

The varieties growing are Moneymaker, Alicante ( a super sandwich tomato ) and Yellowstuffers.

I filled, no less than 7.5litre pots, with good quality multi-purpose compost. Making sure any previously used pots were washed and sterilized first. Should the pots be any smaller in size, keeping the compost moist at all times may prove difficult in a greenhouse situation due to the heat.

Tip: I find that a large plastic dust-bin filled with water and a few swigs of disinfectant, makes washing large pots seriously easy. The bins themselves are readily available to purchase in most DIY stores.

                                –

A frequently asked question I hear all the time is, “I’ve been told to pinch out the sideshoots, what are these ? ”

This depends on which cultivar you have chosen to grow. The two main growth types are indeterminate (also known as cordon) or determinate (also known as bush).  Should you choose to grow a bush variety, any sideshoots should be left on the plant otherwise your crop will be small.  However, on a cordon variety these sideshoots are best pinched out, as to leave them on takes much needed energy away from the main plant, resulting in a poorer quality crop. Our aim is to grow a single-stemmed plant. So its great for us that these infamous sideshoots are so easy to spot, as they grow between the leaf and main stem. But remember, these need constant removal because new ones form throughout the growing season.

Sideshoots – pinch these out.


Sideshoots – removed.

Ok, now that the plant is cleaned of any sideshoots, it’s time to plant it.

Make a hole deeper than the pot it came from, and slightly off centre. The aim here is to bury the plant up to its first set of leaves, which should have been removed. If not, remove them now. The area below will send out a second lot of roots, known as feeder roots. These are short and look for food, such as high potash feeds which should be applied once a week when the first truss ( flower stem) has set. The main (first) roots are long and search for water. Which takes me to the reason why I planted off centre. I like to sink a small pot beside the root ball, this helps to get more water to those longer, thirstier roots.

           Tip: Although the flowers self pollinate, those grown in the greenhouse do benefit from a gentle shake from time to time.

The plant is going to need support, and for this I use canes. Any cane length will do. I ran out of my usual long canes so instead of rushing to the nearest shop. I found a few 4ft lengths in the shed and some string. Being careful not to pierce the rootball I pushed the cane in until it reached the bottom. Cut a length of string and tied it around the top of cane, pulled it taut slightly and secured it to the top of the greenhouse. Then gently tied-in the plant to the cane using a figure of eight and finished by watering in.

Attach like so

Figure of eight tie

Water little and often, compost should be moist at all times. This will help to prevent fruit splitting and blossom end rot. Easier said than done sometimes, I know. As the season progresses do remember to remove any lower leaves around fruit. This helps to ripen fruit, increase air-flow and minimise the risk of disease. And after the 6th truss has set, cut off the top of plant to give the remaining fruit a chance to ripen.

Companion Planting

Oh, and don’t forget about companion planting, a part from the aesthetics, I think it’s a very useful way of controlling pests. I’ve decided to grow marigolds and basil alongside the tomatoes. The french marigolds will give off a strong odour which the green and blackfly hate. Whereas, the basil will help to ward off whitefly, which is starting to become a big problem – must be the weather. Don’t forget, it can also help to attract beneficial insects such as ladybirds and lacewings. If it’s something you don’t do, perhaps it’s worth thinking about.

Final spacing

French marigold ‘roulette’

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy growing !!